WGS.S10 Sex, Race, and the Visual

WGS.S10 Sex, Race, and the Visual

This course examines categories of race, gender, sex, and sexuality through the lens of the visual.  Using contemporary literature, photography, performance art, film, and theories of the visual, our task will be to investigate the import and utility of embodiment.  How do race, gender, and sexuality function in the artistic imaginary?  What can we glean from cultural productions that engage the viewer/reader in ways that challenge ideas about conformity, fluidity, belonging, and self-reflection?  More than a linear literary or artistic trajectory, this course will provide a template for all the mechanisms of the visual—psychological and ocular, interpretive, rhetorical and performative.

WGS.101 Introduction to Women's and Gender Studies

WGS.101 Introduction to Women's and Gender Studies

Drawing on multiple disciplines - such as literature, history, economics, psychology, philosophy, political science, anthropology, media studies and the arts - to examine cultural assumptions about sex, gender, and sexuality. Integrates analysis of current events through student presentations, aiming to increase awareness of contemporary and historical experiences of women, and of the ways sex and gender interact with race, class, nationality, and other social identities. Students are introduced to recent scholarship on gender and its implications for traditional disciplines.

WGS.109 Women and Global Activism in Media and Politics

WGS.109 Women and Global Activism in Media and Politics

An interdisciplinary subject that examines questions of feminism, international women's issues, and globalization through the study of novels, films, critical essays, painting and music. Considers how women redefine the notions of community and nation, how development affects their lives, and how access to the internet and to the production industry impacts women's lives. Primary topics of interest include transformations of traditional values, social change, gender role distribution, identity formation, migration flows, globalization and development, popular culture, urban life, cyber-culture, activism, and human rights.Limited to 25 when Writing Tutor is assigned to the class. Otherwise, limited to 18.

WGS.140 Woke Lit: The Protest Tradition Today

WGS.140 Woke Lit: The Protest Tradition Today

Race and Identity in American Literature [course catalog title]

What role do writers play in a social movement?  How does literature today respond to systemic racism and rampant xenophobia; travel bans and deportation sweeps; police brutality and mass incarceration?  Can a poem, a novel, or an essay make a difference? This course will tackle these questions by pairing contemporary literature, music, film, and television with works by earlier writers who used literature to speak out, fight back, and bear witness.

The pairings we will analyze and discuss include: James Baldwin and Ta-Nehisi Coates; Audre Lorde and Toni Morrison; Frederick Douglass and Colson Whitehead; Gloria Anzaldúa and Valeria Luiselli; José Martí and Lin Manuel-Miranda; Nina Simone and Solange Knowles; Marvin Gaye and D’Angelo; W.E.B. DuBois’s The Souls of Black Folk and Jordan Peele’s Get Out ; Ralph Ellison’s Invisible Man and Sam Esmail’s Mr. Robot

WGS.142 Narrative and Identity: Writing and Film by Contemporary Women of Color

WGS.142 Narrative and Identity: Writing and Film by Contemporary Women of Color

Explores the diverse voices and experiences reflected in writing and film by and about women of color. Examines the roles that culture, community, and kinship play in the development of the writer's individual voice, and compares the similarities and differences of the writer experience across texts and genres. Discussion and assignments, including an independent research presentation, consider the social and political contexts that inform each work, with an emphasis on gender, race, and economic status. Includes works by a variety of novelists, poets, and filmmakers.

WGS.154 [J] Gender and Japanese Popular Culture

WGS.154 [J] Gender and Japanese Popular Culture

Examines relationships between identity and participation in Japanese popular culture as a way of understanding the changing character of media, capitalism, fan communities, and culture. Emphasizes contemporary popular culture and theories of gender, sexuality, race, and the workings of power and value in global culture industries. Topics include manga (comic books), hip-hop and other popular music, anime and feature films, video games, contemporary literature, and online communication. Students present analyses and develop a final project based on a particular aspect of gender and popular culture. Several films screened outside of regular class meeting times. Taught in English.

WGS.190 [J] Black Matters: Introduction to Black Studies

WGS.190 [J] Black Matters: Introduction to Black Studies

Interdisciplinary survey of people of African descent that draws on the overlapping approaches of history, literature, anthropology, legal studies, media studies, performance, linguistics, and creative writing. Connects the experiences of African-Americans and of other American minorities, focusing on social, political, and cultural histories, and on linguistic patterns. Includes lectures, discussions, workshops, and required field trips that involve minimal cost to students

WGS.220 [J] Women and Gender in the Middle East and North Africa

WGS.220 [J] Women and Gender in the Middle East and North Africa

Provides an overview of key issues and themes in the study of women and gender relations in the Middle East and North Africa. Includes readings from a variety of disciplines, e.g., history, anthropology, sociology, literature, religious studies, and media studies. Addresses themes such as the relationship between the concepts of nation and gender; women's citizenship; Middle Eastern women's activism and the involvement of their Western "sisters" to this movement; gendered interpretations of the Qur'an and the example of the Prophet Muhammad; and the three H's of Orientalism (hijab, harem, and hamam).

WGS.229 Race, Culture, and Gender in the US and Beyond: A Psychological Perspective

WGS.229 Race, Culture, and Gender in the US and Beyond: A Psychological Perspective

Examines the biopsychosocial factors which impact racial-ethnic identity, racial and cultural socialization, and experiences of prejudice, bias, discrimination, and racial microaggressions across gender identities. Reviews topics in multicultural psychology from the lens of challenging ethnocentric biases in the field. Critically evaluates the intersection of race with other social identities (e.g., gender, sexual identity, and socioeconomic status) and how it impacts human behavior. Using a case study approach, students integrate empirical evidence from international psychosocial research on oppression in order to provide more breadth in understanding the influence of race and gender upon human behavior. Develops multicultural competency skills essential for practice in clinical and non-clinical organizational settings. Limited to 25.

WGS.S10 History of Women in Science and Engineering

WGS.S10 History of Women in Science and Engineering

Explores the historic roles of women in scientific and engineering endeavors. Examines what sociocultural obstacles women in these disciplines have faced, and how their challenges and successes have changed over time. The course provides a basic overview of the history of women in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). Students will learn about specific contributions of women across a variety of disciplines and will gain a broad perspective on how these contributions played a larger role in the advancement of human knowledge and technological achievement. The class will also grapple with how both historic and modern biases within the STEM disciplines, as well as in representations of women and girls in media and popular culture, can affect outcomes in these areas.    

WGS.101 Introduction to Women’s and Gender Studies

WGS.101 Introduction to Women’s and Gender Studies

Drawing on multiple disciplines - such as literature, history, economics, psychology, philosophy, political science, anthropology, media studies and the arts - to examine cultural assumptions about sex, gender, and sexuality. Integrates analysis of current events through student presentations, aiming to increase awareness of contemporary and historical experiences of women, and of the ways sex and gender interact with race, class, nationality, and other social identities. Students are introduced to recent scholarship on gender and its implications for traditional disciplines.

WGS.110 Sexual and Gender Identities

WGS.110 Sexual and Gender Identities

Provides an introduction to the history of gender, sex, and sexuality in the modern United States, from the end of the 19th century to the present. Surveys historical approaches to the field, emphasizing the changing nature of sexual and gender identities over time. Traces attempts to control, construct, and contain sexual and gender identities. Examines the efforts of those who worked to resist, reject, and reform institutionalized heterosexuality and mainstream configurations of gendered power.

WGS.111 Gender and Media Studies

WGS.111 Gender and Media Studies

Examines representations of race, gender, and sexual identity in the media. Considers issues of authorship, spectatorship, and the ways in which various media (film, television, print journalism, advertising) enable, facilitate, and challenge these social constructions in society. Studies the impact of new media and digital media through analysis of gendered and racialized language and embodiment online in blogs and vlogs, avatars, and in the construction of cyberidentities. Provides introduction to feminist approaches to media studies by drawing from work in feminist film theory, cultural studies, gender and politics, and cyberfeminism.

WGS.125: Games and Culture

WGS.125: Games and Culture

Examines the social, cultural, economic, and political aspects of digital games. Topics include the culture of gameplay, gaming styles, communities, spectatorship and performance, gender and race within digital gaming, and the politics and economics of production processes, including co-creation and intellectual property. Students taking graduate version complete additional readings and assignments.

WGS.145 Globalization: The Good, the Bad and the In-Between

WGS.145 Globalization: The Good, the Bad and the In-Between

Examines the cultural paradoxes of contemporary globalization. Studies the cultural, artistic, social and political impact of globalization across international borders. Students analyze contending definitions of globalization and principal agents of change, and why some of them engender backlash; identify the agents, costs and benefits of global networks; and explore how world citizens preserve cultural specificity. Case studies on global health, human trafficking and labor migration illuminate the shaping influence of contemporary globalization on gender, race, ethnicity, and class. Develops cultural literacy through analysis of fiction and film. Enrollment limited.